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CLOSED DOORS SAVE LIVES

CLOSED DOORS SAVE LIVES

By The LifeDoor Institute 

Keeping your family safe at home is especially important when it comes to the danger of residential fires.

  We’re most vulnerable to fire when we’re asleep for several reasons:

  • We’re less alert when we’re asleep and less likely to notice a fire right away.
  • Today’s home fires spread 600% faster today than they did 40 years ago.
  • It only takes a few breaths of smoke to become disoriented, or even die.

50% of residential fires happen between 11:00pm and 7:00am. Most people are asleep during these times.  

 There Are Less Fires Nowadays, but Fire-Related Deaths Are Increasing

Since 2008, there have been fewer fires but fire-related deaths have increased. Why? 

Today’s Fires Are More Toxic:

  • Poisonous gases produced by fire can make you sleepy and disoriented. Toxic glasses and smoke kill more people in fires than flames do.
  • Todays’ homes are filled with synthetic materials that burn hotter, faster, and more toxic than ever before.
  • Today’s homes are larger with more open floor plans that allow fires to grow and spreader faster

    Sleep With Your Doors Closed Closed doors slow down the spread of fire and the toxic smoke and gases that kill with a few breaths. They also reduce temperatures in a home fire, providing life-saving time for your family to escape or be rescued.

    A closed door can mean your room only reaches 100 degrees. An open door can easily reach 1,000+ degrees. 

    If You Can’t Keep a Door Closed, Use LifeDoor (Many people have important reasons why they don’t sleep with their door closed, for them there’s LifeDoor)

    Install a LifeDoor device on the back of your bedroom doors. LifeDoor automatically shuts your doors during a fire, giving you more time to get out.

     

    If You’re In Your Bedroom and There’s a Fire 

     Feel the closed bedroom door for heat. If it’s hot uses a secondary escape such as a window. If the door is not hot, open slightly and check if it looks safe to exit the building. If it’s safe, exit immediately. If the rest of the building is too hot or smokey close the door and exit from the window. 

    If the bedroom is too high up, place clothing or a towel at the base of the door to block smoke. Open a window and signal the responding fire crews by waving clothing or something visible.

    Additional Ways to Stay Safe

    Install a fire ladder in rooms above the first floor.

    Check and test smoke alarms regularly.

    Have a family escape plan and practice it every six months at least twice a year

    If there is a fire, get out and stay out. 

    ABOUT THE LIFEDOOR INSTITUTE

    The LifeDoor Institute is the public safety division of LifeDoor, a firefighter-founded company dedicated to saving lives with awareness, education, and technology. LifeDoor’s products close bedroom doors in the event of a fire, preventing and slowing the spread of fires and deadly smoke, giving firefighters more time to save family members. To learn more, visit www.lifedoor.io

     

    Firefighters Launch Company With New Product That Saves Lives

    Firefighters Launch Company With New Product That Saves Lives

    LifeDoor Launches Tech Device That Closes Doors and Protects Homes In Fire

    EVERETT, WA October 7, 2019 – Just in time for Fire Prevention week, LifeDoor, the firefighter-founded technology company, today announces the sale of its first mass-market residential device, the LD1, now available nationwide at https://www.lifedoor.io/

     

    The LD1 is a small, easy-to-install device that shuts a bedroom door in the event of a fire, buying residents valuable time to escape by slowing the spread of fire and toxic smoke. 

     

    Why Are Home Fires So Deadly?

     

    - They Happen When We’re Vulnerable: 50% of residential fires happen when most people are sleeping and vulnerable, between 11:00pm and 7:00am. A closed bedroom door provides you and your family extra time to escape safely.

     

    - They’re Faster Than Ever: House fires spread 600% faster today than they did 40 years ago. Todays’ homes are filled with synthetic materials that burn hotter, faster, and more toxic than ever before.

     

    - Toxic Gases Disorient and Confuse Your Brain Before Killing You: Poisonous gases produced by fire can disorient your mind so you’re less likely to think straight and escape. A few breaths can kill you. Toxic glasses and smoke kill more people in fires than flames do.

     

    How the LD1 Works

    The LD1 is triggered by the sound of a home’s existing smoke alarms. Once triggered, the LD1 automatically closes the door its attached to, sounding its own alarm and lighting up the room. LifeDoor can extend the survivable time for occupants or minimize damage to the room if no one is home. If the safest way to exit the house is through that door, LifeDoor is easily reopened.

     

    Lifedoor’s Beginning

    One restless night at the fire station,Joel Sellinger, (now LifeDoor Co-Founder), was worrying about his wife and young daughter at home because he knew they both liked to sleep with their doors open.

     

    “I’ve seen first hand, the dramatic difference a closed door makes during a fire. It literally can be the difference between life and death.” said Joel, “As a firefighter you tend to worry more about these things because you see how that kind of loss affects people every day. So one night, instead of just worrying, I had this idea; to buy an automatic door closer that would work with my smoke alarms. When I realized nothing like that existed, I got right to work making it. I decided to partner with my friend and now Co-Founder, Ben Docksteader. Ben is also a dad and understands the importance of what we were working on. He brings 20 years of product design and manufacturing to the team and has been an integral part of getting LifeDoor to the market. Together we’ve built LifeDoor from the ground up and we’re excited to help save lives and limit property damage.”

     

    “Closed doors save lives,” says Joel. “Rooms with closed doors always fair better than the rest of a burning home. Sometimes, rooms with closed doors look perfectly untouched. If you are in a fire, and you and your family are lucky enough to be in a room with a closed door, you have more time to escape or be rescued. The new LD1 device gives people that peace of mind that they’ll have extra time to escape in the event of a house fire.”

     

    The LD1 can be purchased in single and three packs on LifeDoor’s website:

    https://www.lifedoor.io/



    About LifeDoor

    LifeDoor is a firefighter-founded technology company dedicated to saving lives in the event of a fire. LifeDoor’s products close bedroom doors in the event of a fire, preventing and slowing the spread of fires and deadly smoke, giving people more time to escape and firefighters more time for rescue. To learn more, visit www.lifedoor.io

    Why Closing the Bedroom Door at Night Could Save Your Life

    Why Closing the Bedroom Door at Night Could Save Your Life
    Doorway leading into bedroom

     

    Your nightly routine can (and should) include brushing your teeth, washing your face, and getting into comfy PJs, but new information shows that most Americans skip a very important step before climbing into bed.

    Nearly 60% of people sleep with their bedroom door open, according to a recent survey conducted by the safety science organization UL. That simple choice could mean life or death in the event of a house fire, as a closed door can slow the spread of flames, reduce toxic smoke, improve oxygen levels, and decrease temperatures.

    With the increased use of synthetics in furniture and home construction, closing the door could make all the difference when it comes to getting out safely. The average time to escape a home fire has gone from 17 minutes to just three minutes or less in the past few decades due to flammable materials and contemporary open floor plans.

    The "Close Before You Doze" campaign aims to share how closed doors can help save people's lives. In one eye-opening demonstration, the group showed how a fire burns in a closed room versus an open one. The side-by-side video footage reveals what an impact a door can make.

    Start making it a habit to close not only your own bedroom door at night, but your kids' rooms as well. It's also a good time to test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, check your home for potential fire hazards, and review your family's escape plan, or create one if you haven't already. Those small precautions could make all the difference.